0

For 2 molecules to be in the same hydrogen environment, must they have the same molecular formula?
e.g CH3 and CH3 would be considered in the same environment if it had the same bonding behaviour
CH3 and CH2 would not be considered in the same environment regardless of its bonding behavour.
Please clarify this, thanks!


Notice: Undefined index: title in /home3/wmroi/public_html/merspi.com.au/qa-theme/NewMerspi/qa-theme.php on line 1251

1 Answer

0
 
Best answer

Essentially you are 100% correct. It is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the "molecular formula" in the immediate vicinity to be correct.

In other words: CH3 and CH2 will never have the same hydrogen environment (but in fact it is precisely due to the bonding behaviour - there are more hydrogen bonds on one than the other!!)

But CH3 and CH3 may have the same hydrogen environment, but not always. E.g.: CH3-CH2-CHCl-CH3

The CH3s here are not in the same environment (due to the bonding behaviour around it being different, yes).

The only thing I would avoid is your terminology. "Bonding behaviour" and "molecular formula" are one and the same, but what you mean is the molecular formula in the local area/immediate vicinity vs. the rest of the molecule (what you are calling "bonding behaviour").


Notice: Undefined index: title in /home3/wmroi/public_html/merspi.com.au/qa-theme/NewMerspi/qa-theme.php on line 1251