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What will be the implications of genetically engineered crops that are not sterile establishing wild poppulations on their own specie's evolution?

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It depends on the nature of the GM crops. Assuming that only one transgene has been added and no other genetic material modified, the affect is likely to be minimal on the species' evolution. The implications are as follows:


There is a new gene in the genome which confers an advantage to all crops in the domesticated population.
Genetically modified organisms may have their genetic material hybridised with non-GM crops of the same species. However, apart from the one transgene that is likely to be neither selected for or against by selection pressures in the new environment, there would be no difference between this and non-GM domesticated crops with artificially selected traits crossing with wild populations or making wild populations. This may already be happening.
Allele frequencies for the transgenic allele will increase as a result of this new variation which has been artificially introduced. However, trends in allele frequencies for other traits would not be altered by the GE crops unless they conferred some sort of advantage.
If we look outside the species to the GM crops' weedy relatives, here is where evolution might be more significantly changed. If a GM crop's gamete manages to form a zygote with the gamete of weedy relatives (this has happened in the past), a new allele which is at a selective advantage in herbicide filled fields for examples will emerge and increase in frequency. This could not only result in ubiquitous weeds in the farm, but it would also affect the GM crops, making them less competitive due to the added interspecific competition between two herbicide tolerant species for example.


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