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  Higher intesity light, delivering
  energy at a greater rate, woudl
  produce electrons with higher kinetic
  energies, so the stopping potential
  differance would depend on intensity


What is the stopping potential differance

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1 Answer

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The stopping potential difference is the potential that has to be applied across the metal for no photocurrent to be detected. In other words, it's the potential that needs to be applied to give the electrons (which would otherwise be moving) 0 velocity. The magnitude of this voltage has to be the same as kinetic energy which the photoelectrons would have had a voltage of 0 been applied.

What the statement up there is saying is that if the wave model were correct, the stopping voltage would be proportional to how bright the light is. We know this isn't the case from experiments. What we find, however, is that it's connected to the frequency of the light. This shows that the energy is delivered in little parcels to the electrons - it only depends on the frequency of the light, not how much of it shines on it.

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